Copyright 2015 Caswell County Beekeepers Association

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MAY-JUNE HIVE MANAGEMENT
This is our busy time for hive management. Expect to remain busy beekeepers until the flow is over.
Colonies continue increasing their populations.  SWARMS CONTINUE HAPPENING TOO!
THE “FLOW” IS BIG THIS YEAR. CHECK YOUR SUPERS EVERY WEEK. ADD MORE SUPERS IF NECESSARY.
Check your hives, some could become honey bound. If this happens, the queen is hard pressed to find a place to lay brood. Extraction and drawn comb replacement becomes necessary. Beekeepers without extra drawn comb will have to replace frames of capped honey with frames of new foundation.
Honey Bees really like a small upper hive entrance. A 5/8” hole drilled in the upper box , to the left or right of the handle works great.
Good ventilation for each hive helps the bees cure the nectar dry enough for capping.
Having extra equipment becomes essential.
Hives ready to swarm construct queen cells on the bottom of hive frames.
These cells can be seen easily by tilting each hive body upward at a 45-degree angle.
A closed queen cell is an alert that the colony is almost ready to swarm.  
Insert IPM sticky boards to determine early season mite loads.
Latest varroa data:  IF YOU HAVE MORE THAN OR EQUAL TO THREE MITES PER HUNDRED BEES, YOUR COLONY IS STRESSED BY VARROA.
Remove entrance reducers or turn them so the bees use the large slot for hive entrance/exit.

Association meetings are each fourth Thursday of each month at 7:00 p.m.

Location: Basement of the Ag. Building beside the Old Courthouse                  LOOK           Like us on  

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Attend our association meetings, and continue learning about how to remain successful beekeepers.

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SUPPORT CCBA and SUPPORT BEEKEEPING

PREPARE FOR THE  CASWELL COUNTY HOE DOWN

SEPTEMBER 19th.